Week 6

Week 6 is where the whole group collaborated on the final ideas and the actual logistical planning of the track.

The main track idea is that there are 3 colours of track that the robot can detect, with balloons along each path. The 3 colours show a different level of difficulty, with higher difficulties having a higher multiplier to the points scored from bursting balloons, (i.e. harder track = more points). If the user directs the robot off-track, there is a points penalty.  The main difference between the tracks is that the more difficult the track, the more complex and narrow the coloured strip becomes.

The layout would be based around a simple oval track, (the easiest track to follow), with harder tracks coming off the sides, (similar to how a real racetrack is laid out), making the user choose which track to take and making the game more varied.

We also decided upon the materials that would be required for producing such a track. This will be collected and built in the coming weeks.

Week 6

Week 5

This was the week that the final finishing touches were added to both the hardware and software elements of the robot. The major change was adding a touch sensor on the top to allow us to implement a feature where the game would start after the sensor is tripped and resets if the game is already running.. This was a useful addition as it means that the user has full control of when the game starts and feels as though they have some input.

This week also featured the start of the planning involved in building a suitably sized and laid out track for our robot to interact with. I was part of this. We decided upon the basic ideas behind the layout and the surface area that the track would need to cover to make it an engaging and interesting game experience for the player. With this in mind, I came up with the ideas behind the surface area of the tracks and the actual size required to fit the robot on it and allow the game to proceed for a full minute.

Week 5